AccuRender nXt

advanced rendering for AutoCAD

"I'm usually rendering fairly detailed AutoCAD architectural models on 3D
modeled sites with lots of AccuRender trees and shrubs.  I was wondering
what AccuRender 4 (using Acad2004) and AccuRender nXt (using Acad2011)
actually "sees" when you select a view to render.  Do they "see" and have to
"consider" the 50 trees behind the building (adding a lot of calculating
time to a rendering), or do these programs "hide" and never consider the
stuff that's hidden in a view by other entities?"

Everything in the models takes time to render, so we recommend you use images for background trees, and only use fractal trees for tree for which the additional detail will make a difference.

The 3D Fractal Plants show more and more detail, the more you zoom in on them.

But for plants which are in the background, the 2D images work well and save considerable rendering time.

Here is a rendering of two plants - zoomed in - the one on the left is rendered as a 2D image, the one on the right is rendered as a 3D, Fractal plant. If you look closely you can see the better detail in the 3D, Fractal plant.

Rendered plants.jpg

However, when these two plants a zoomed out a bit the difference is almost not noticeable.

Views: 226

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Sounds like good method... something I need to look into as I've never used tree images.

Assuming I want to continue working the old way using only fractal trees... Does AutoCAD and AccuRender take time to calculate trees hidden by buildings etc?  I can see from the on-screen messages that go by, that the first step AccuRender does is to change all the AutoCAD render-able objects to faces.  I assume it converts all the objects in the model (including the hidden stuff).  Does it then use the "front row" of faces to hide the "back row" of faces?  If that's the case, I can see that turning off the trees that are hidden would save a lot of time.  (But then again... I charge by the hour!  Just kidding... I don't like wasting time.)

nXt doesn't really work like that-- all of the objects need to be taken.  An object which is hidden from view may show up in a reflection, a shadow, refracted through glass, contribute to diffuse reflection of light in the scene, etc..  

OTOH turning off objects which don't participate does not usually save a lot of time unless you are in a low-memory situation.

RSS

Search

Translate

Latest Activity

Daniel Hargreaves posted a discussion

Accustudio

I know this is hard to believe, but Accustudio is over 20 years old. It has been quiet for a couple of years now at the site. I'm looking to hand it off to the next generation. Is there anyone interested in working on the site and eventually taking over the ownership of it?See More
Tuesday
Roy Hirshkowitz replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio texture editing
"Currently only one texture per component and one bump map.  There is a blended material which allows more complex permutations-- most people do texture blending in photoshop. Solid textures refer to the granite/marble/wood procedural…"
Monday
Roy Hirshkowitz replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio testing
"Yes, it will be different.  Typing arstudio should be roughly the same operation as "running a quick test render"-- it may be a little slower, and the first time you type it, it will certainly be slower (it was before). …"
Monday
Peter Milner replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio texture editing
"A further question: What is a solid texture?"
Nov 28
Peter Milner replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio texture editing
"Okay. Another question on textures: In nXt you can layer different textures and bump maps to create a more complex material. For example, the Oak veneer material (image attached) uses two bump maps: one for the grain and one for the flecks. In…"
Nov 28
Peter Milner replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio testing
"It's more that, when putting a render together, I work on the model, run a quick test render, go back to the model to adjust/add things, run a quick test render etc etc. Having to close studio down and then re-open it every time I want to…"
Nov 28
Roy Hirshkowitz replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio texture editing
"For AutoCAD I don't think you need to manipulate this-- leaving it alone should work.  It's there for other applications (Rhino, Sketchup, etc.) which permit multiple sets of texture coordinates on the same mesh-- native AutoCAD…"
Nov 27
Roy Hirshkowitz replied to Peter Milner's discussion AR Studio testing
"There's an autocad command for tagging objects as lights-- it's called something like arstudiolight-- I'll check. ***** You can start an out-of-process final rendering and close ArStudio down and continue to work without shutting the…"
Nov 27

© 2019   Header image courtesy Peter Milner   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service